Flower Magazine

MAY-JUN 2019

Browse "flower" to learn techniques from established and up-and-coming designers, be inspired by the floral decor of weddings, galas, and flower and garden shows, and infuse your lifestyle with chic floral fashion and home decor.

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38 | M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 9 FRESH STYLE I garden At Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, D.C., the genius of landscape designer Beatrix Farrand remains on full display, almost 100 years after she first conceived the gardens By KAREN CARROLL A Capital Legacy OU ARE THE PEARL OF HOSTESSES and clients . . . the combination of a place like the Oaks, a climate like Washington and the sympathetic and quick understanding of a critical friend make a stimulus to one's imagination and a wish to do one's very best work," wrote landscape designer Beatrix Farrand to Mildred Bliss, the mistress of Dumbarton Oaks, in a letter dated July 7, 1922. Nearly 100 years later, the gardens do indeed stand testament that Farrand, the only female founding member of the American Society of Landscape Architects, adeptly achieved her desire. The gardens, sculpted out of a steeply sloping property in the heart of Georgetown, continue to thrive and flourish, a verdant oasis of serenity in striking contrast to the bustle of nearby Dupont Circle or the cacophony of political posturing on Capitol Hill. "Her genius was in the way she fit these gardens into the challenging topography and how she mixed a European formal garden aesthetic with a more naturalistic American landscape style," says Jonathan Kavalier, director of gardens and grounds for Dumbarton. "It's the most well-preserved example of Farrand's work, as unfortunately most of Y PHOTOS: SPENCER LENFIELD/DUMBARTON OAKS (TOP) AND ALBERT KNAPP/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO The urn terrace (top) features an urn modeled on an 18th-century terra-cotta one that Mildred and Robert Bliss purchased in France. The original is now housed in the rare book library of the 1801 Federal-style house (above) that the Blisses gifted to Harvard University in 1940.

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